NASA’s Launch Pad Water Deluge System

Well, NASA has recently done some testing of its heat/flame control system that helps keep the launch platform safer during rocket launches. Granted, with an ability to release about half-a-million gallons of water in 60 seconds, we are REALLY talking about a water gun with output rated at ~1,066,667x. Its ability to produce the 100′ man-made geysers is a nice effect. Granted, there appear to be three primary nozzles so each one has an output of a mere ~355,556x

Not bad…  I want one!

See: https://www.universetoday.com/140316/this-is-how-nasa-releases-almost-half-a-million-gallons-of-water-in-60-seconds/

Soak on!

iSoaker Warriors (Facebook) Removed

In light of all the privacy and data issues on Facebook (plus given the fact that I never really liked that platform), I’ve opted to remove the “iSoaker Warriors Facebook” page.

All-in-all, not much of a loss, truthfully. There wasn’t any major content on there, anyhow, and its visibility was mediocre at best. Besides, with what little free time I have these days, might as well focus on developing content where I find most enjoyment, anyhow.

Soak on!

Superionic Water Ice?

Something a little different:

Though it may be awhile (and a little impractical) to try to load this stuff into a water blaster, scientists seem to have determined a new state for ice. Granted, they used some lasers and diamonds to compress water ice VII even more.

From the Nature Physics article: “Using time-resolved optical pyrometry and laser velocimetry measurements as well as supporting density functional theory–molecular dynamics (DFT-MD) simulations, we document the shock equation of state of H2O to unprecedented extreme conditions and unravel thermodynamic signatures showing that ice melts near 5,000K at 190 GPa.”

To think steel melts at ~1,650K and here we are talking about water, but under some serious pressure.

Granted, with that heat and pressure, not sure one would want to be hit by it.

Soak on!

How do you measure water blaster performance?

Many avid water warfare enthusiasts proclaim “We want high performance water blasters!” Those familiar with the Super Soaker CPS Series will often point back to the water blaster models released between 1996-2002 and declare those are the blasters to serve as golden standards and preferably to beat!

However, taking a step back, what do we define as a high performance water blaster? Sure, attributes like styling, build, ergonomics, and durability are important, but they are not measures of performance (or are they?) For sake of argument, this current discussion will focus on water stream generation performance. However, even limiting the discussion to this still leaves plenty of room for a lot of complexity. Perhaps in some future article, we can view water blasters more holistically.

Continue reading “How do you measure water blaster performance?”

Thoughts on Water Gun / Water Blaster Range Testing (2017)

Last weekend, I finally had time when Mother Nature was cooperating well enough to permit me to do some range testing on some of my newer water blaster acquisitions. As noted on iSoaker.com, range tests were completed for the Water Warriors Drench Force, Water Warriors Steady Stream X, Xshot Typhoon Thunder, Nerf Super Soaker DartFire, Nerf Super Soaker Zombie Strike Revenge Infector, Adventure Force Super Storm, and Adventure Force Hydro Blitz. For those interested in the various stats, please visit the specific water blaster model’s page of interest. Instead of merely listing results in this post, I want to share some of my other observations from the range tests. Continue reading “Thoughts on Water Gun / Water Blaster Range Testing (2017)”

Predicting Pump-Action Water Gun / Water Blaster Performance

Just posted my thoughts and findings regarding Predicting Pump-Action Water Gun / Water Blaster Performance. In short, it appears one can use either pump stroke length or, if available, pump volume to reasonably estimate expected output for most pump-action water blasters. It is unclear how this scales up for larger, syringe-type water blasters due to lack of available measurements for those type of water blasters. Follow the link above to read more specifics!